čtvrtek 24. července 2014

GSoC - Mock improvements - week 9

This week I've been mostly focusing on minor improvements and documentation (manpages). Almost all my changes were already submitted upstream and if everything goes well, you can expect a new release of mock to be available in rawhide in the near future. I merged changes from the ready branch to master so now they should differ only in minor things. (Sorry for duplicates in git history, I didn't realize that beforehand)

Support for Mikolaj's nosync external library was added and the old implementations that existed as a part of mock were dropped. You can enable it by setting
config_opts['nosync'] = True
and you have to install the nosync library (mock doesn't require it in the specfile, because it's not available everywhere). If the target is multilib, you need both aritectures of the library to be installed in order to have a preload library for both types of executables. If you don't, it will print a warning and won't be activated. If you can't install both versions and still want to use it, set
config_opts['nosync_force'] = True
but expect a lot of (harmless) warnings from ld.so.  The library is available in rawhide (your mirrors might not have picked it yet)

LVM plugin was moved to separate subpackage and conditionaly disabled on RHEL 6, since it requires lvm2-python-libs and newer kernel and glibc (for setns). One of the things that I needed to sacrifice when I was making the LVM plugin was the IPC namespace unsharing, which mock uses for a long time. The problem was that lvcreate and other commands deadlocked on unitialized semaphore in the new namespace, so I temporarily disabled it and hoped I'll find a solution later. And I did, I wrapped all functions that manipulate LVM in function that calls setns to get back to global IPC namespace and after the command is done, it call setns again to get back to mock's IPC namespace.

One of the other problems I encountered is Python's (2.7) handling of SIGPIPE signal. It sets it to ignored and doesn't set it back to default when it executes a new process, so a shell launched from Python 2 (by Popen, or execve) doesn't always behave the same as regular shell.
Example in shell:
$ cat /dev/zero | head -c5
# cat got SIGPIPE and exited without error

$ python -c 'import subprocess as s; s.call(["bash"])'
$ cat /dev/zero | head -c5
cat: write error: Broken pipe
# SIGPIPE was ignored and cat got EPIPE from write()

It can be fixed by calling
signal.signal(signal.SIGPIPE, signal.SIG_DFL)
in Popen's preexec_fn argument.

For cat it's just an example and it didn't make much difference. But if you put tee between the cat and head, it will loop indefinitely instead of exiting after first 5 bytes. And there are lots of scripts out there relying on the standard behavior. It actually bit me in one of my other programs, so I thought it's worth sharing and I also fixed it in mock.

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